Galeuse d’Eysines


Last night, after a rough day of biodiesel wrangling, I sat in bed and read The Compleat Squash by Amy Goldman. It’s total vegetable porn but with great information. I’ve been telling people, for instance, that the squash pictured here in my garden is a Marina di Chioggia (I lost the original seed packet) but now I know that it’s the Galeuse d’Eysines, a different kind of warty monster. Goldman says the squash was bred to look like this in the Burgundy region of France (the original species came from South America). Its flesh will be quite dense, dry, and orange. I have about seven of these; and about seven of the Gill’s Blue Hubbards–plenty to make it through the fall months.
I also learned that because I planted two kinds of Cucurbita maxima varietals fairly close to each other, I can’t save the seed. Or maybe I will, and see if I get some crazy cross-breed. According to Goldman, one should harvest the squash when the skin of the squash can’t be punctured with your thumbnail. The book inspired me for next year’s garden–I’m going to plant the Winter Luxury Pie (cucurbita pepo), Musquee de Provence (curcubita moschata), Marina di Chioggia (curcubita maxima). By planting only one varietal of each species, I can save the seeds and they’ll produce ‘true’ offspring.

3 responses to “Galeuse d’Eysines

  1. Oh, we should do a seed exchange! I’ll find some seeds from grandpa or the neighbors. That would be fun.

  2. Novella Carpenter

    riana; yeah, let’s do it. i love those french melons…

  3. Dear Novella
    Really interested to read this as yesterday I enterered my 2 huge Galeuse d’Eysines squash in our Autumn Show only to be told that no prize was in order as they are not squashes but pumpkins! I can’t find a definition that explains the difference except that I notice that American websites seem to use the term pumpkin more freely. Can enyone enlighten me? Thanks
    Geo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s