Calendar

2014 Sked
Classes
February 16: Make an Apple Tree. 12-2pm
Grafting scion wood onto a vigorous rootstock is the cheapest way to make a fruit tree. This class will show you how to do just that. Disease-free apple compatible rootstock will be provided, as well as scion wood from various heirloom variety apple trees. Everyone will go home with a grafted tree in a pot. If you want to collect your own scion wood, go to the scion exchange in Berkeley at the Ed Roberts Campus, just across from the Ashby BART, on January 18 from 12-3; or another scion exchange to collect your own scion wood. The class will also include a tour of the farm which has about 25 fruit trees in various stages of development. $40.

March 22: Seed Propagation. 12-2pm
Starting vegetables from seed is the best way to save money on your farm. We will cover which containers work best, how to sterilize them, how to make your own potting soil mixes, basic botany and biology of seed starting, where to order seeds–all so you can get a jump on your summer garden. Taught by Willow Rosenthal. Everyone goes home with a tray of freshly sown seeds. $40
This class will be followed by a plant sale, open to the public, free, 3pm-6pm.

April 26: Urban Chickens 12-2
Raising chickens for eggs is fun and easy. Hens are favorites of children, and they provide the farm with fresh eggs and much-needed manure. Come check out the chicken coop at GhostTown Farm and see how to save money on animal bedding, how to compost chicken manure, how to build a predator proof coop, and basic chicken handling and health. Finally, we will end the day with a poached egg demonstration. We will also hold a best-egg tasting, so bring any eggs for our panel of judges to taste. $40.

May: Farm Stand. Exact date and time TBD

June 14: Farm Stand and Book Release Party. 12-2
To celebrate the publication of my latest book, Gone Feral: Tracking My Dad Through the Wild; we will be having a book release party with foraged snacks and wildly fermented beverages. I’ll be there selling produce and doing a reading from the book. Free.

July: No events

August 23: Tomato Processing Class
One of the easiest plants to grow, tomatoes make great fresh eating. But they are also fabulous roasted, dehydrated, turned into ketchup, made into tomato juice, or canned whole. This class will start with a tasting of various tomato products, then segue into actually processing the beautiful fruits for your pantry. Everyone will go home with a quart jar of home-canned tomatoes. $40

Summer/Fall 2013 Sked:

July 5: Farm Stand. Fresh produce for sale! Honey extraction demo. 5pm-7pm
July 6: Open farm day. Tours on the hour (10:15, 11:15, 12:15), mulberry tasting, produce for sale! 10am-1pm

August 2: Farm Stand. Fresh produce for sale! 5pm-7pm

September 28: Open farm day. Tours (10:15, 11:15, 12:15), fresh produce for sale! 10am-1pm

October 4: Pumpkin patch and farm stand. Fresh produce for sale! Honey extraction demo. 4pm-6pm
October 5: Pumpkin patch and open farm day. Tours (10:15, 11:15, 12:15). Fresh produce for sale, pick a pumpkin for Halloween. 10am-1pm

Essential Urban Farmer 2012 events

February 29
Women’s Building, SanFrancisco, 18th street, 5:30. $2 at the door, first come first serve

March 10
Biofuel Oasis, Berkeley, Ashby and Sacramento, 2pm. Ask an urban farmer, free

March 19
UCBerkeley, Barrows Hall, 6:30-8pm, free

March 28
Northern Michigan University

April 1, Open Farm day!!! 11-2 at Ghosttown Farm

April 3
Wesleyan, Bloomington.

April 7
Omnivore Books, SF

April 9, Books inc, SF 7:30

April 21
Market Hall, Oakland, College Ave, honey extraction demo

April 22
Oakland farmers market, Lexicon of Sustainability booth
April 23
Laney community college
April 26
Ecology Center, Berkeley, SanPablo, presentation

Fall 2011 Events
Maker Faire, Temescal, October 16 with Melissa Hardy of the Biofuel Oasis. Demo of a honey extraction and tabling all day.

Spring 2011 Events

March 26 Hayward Main Library, 2pm. Hayward chose Farm City as their community read!

March 28 Salt Lake City, Westminster College, 7pm public talk

March 31 Alameda Public Library, 7pm. Alameda chose Farm City as their community read!

April 1 San Francisco’s Booksmith, 1644 Haight Street 6:30pm. I’ll be there doing the Bookswap! Buy tickets here. I’ll be dressed as a donkey.

April 3, Urban Farm Tour, Biofuel Oasis 9:30-2pm. I’ll be guiding the tour with Serena Barlett, to buy tickets, go here.

April 6, Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo 5pm-7pm. Farm City is Cuesta’s book of the year! Woot!

April 7, SLO, Steynberg Gallery, 11-1:30pm.

April 13, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, 7pm

April 17, Teaching Raising Chickens class at the Biofuel Oasis, 2pm-5pm.

April 19, Minnesota, M State-Moorhead, 4pm free public lecture

April 28, Seattle, Washington Hall, part of the Essential Arts Art and Agriculture program, 7pm

May 14 Hayward Ochoa Garden. Remember how Farm City was chosen as Hayward’s community read? The librarians and Hayward Public schools are working together to do a garden work day on May 14, 10am-1pm. I’ll be there, hoe-ing.

Upcoming Events Through the End of 2010

10/9 Pt Reyes,  Point Reyes Books, 7pm

10/17 Albany, Albany Public Library, 2-3pm

10/20 Oakland, Pop Up General Store, 47th and MLK, 5pm-7pm

10/24 Livermore, Livermore Public Library, 2pm

11/2 San Francisco, Radar Reading, SF Public Library 7pm

11/6 San Leandro, San Leandro Public Library, 2pm

Past Readings and Hands-on classes

6/5   San Francisco Omnivore Books at 3pm

6/7    Boston, Porter Square Books at 7pm

6/8   Philadelphia, Free Library, 7:30

6/9    Baltimore, Enoch Free Library (with Baltimore Green Works) 7pm

6/10   Salt Lake City – SLC Main Public Library 7pm

6/16    SF – The Green Arcade, 7pm

6/20 Berkeley–Biofuel Oasis The Goat Class, 9:30-1 (must register here).

December 2, Berkeley, CA, Biofuel Oasis, 7pm, Moonlight Soiree, Reading and signing

December 5, Berkeley, CA The Pasta Shop, 4th Street, 1-3pm

December 6, Lafayette, CA, Mt. Diablo Nursery, 1-4

February 27, Silicon Valley, Morgan Hill Public Library, reading and seedling distribution, time TBA

March 21, Berkeley, CA, Raising Rabbits class, Biofuel Oasis, 10-1,

March 30, San Francisco, CA, Bernal Heights Library, details TBA

March 13, Tucson, AZ, Tucson Book Festival, Living a Sustainable Lifestyle slideshow and talk, followed by a book signing.

April 17-18, Wisconsin, Fox Cities Book Festival, details TBA

April 29, Arlington, VA, details TBA

 

GhostTown Farm Events

August 29th Open Farm Tour 10am-10pm with events throughout the day, as part of the Eat Real Festival in Oakland

October 18th Chicken Class at the Biofuel OasisFall 2011

23 responses to “Calendar

  1. Doug Bergstrom

    I see you will be in Seattle in July … please tell me (us) where in Seattle you will be and for how long and what (if) you will be doing any presentation … thanks … d

  2. don’t forget to mention the dinner at eccolo!!! june 15th–urban farming and foraging dinner to celebrate the release of novella’s book!!

  3. Novella ~ what a treat it was to have you at the store this last weekend, and by “have you” I DO mean your book-signing (and catching up with friends from long-ago). I’m truly sorry we didn’t get to spend more time together, as I’m sure we’d have many “slt” stories to share….. be that as it may, you were wonderful, and we hope to see you again. Sooner, as opposed to later. Thanks, again…. M.A. (in a scary little town) @ Sage

  4. Hi Novella – I attended your appearance at Omnivore & there was slight mention of your radio broadcast that had just happened, some folks had listened. What radio station was it, I’d like to try and listen to the podcast? Thanks in advance, love what your doing!! Your funny, easy to follow.

    Kate

  5. Hi Novella, OMG it was so crowded and hot at 18 Reasons on Saturday that I left and went to see “Home Grown” at the roxie. You may already know about these people, but if not, check out their website: http://www.pathtofreedom.com/
    It was a really interesting, inspiring and a little funky movie. Hope you had fun reading and sweating in that tiny room! It was a beautiful night in the city.

  6. Just read your book. Loved it. Hope you make it to Texas.

  7. ghosttownfarm

    douglas: i am coming to texas! austin. nov 1, book fest panel. hope you’ll come by!

  8. Your book was a slow read because I didn’t want it to end. November 21 in Sacramento is on my calendar – in ink.

  9. Hi Novella,

    I’ve been gardening (working my way up to farming) in the city for about a year now and read your book last month for much needed inspiration. It was terrific! I passed it along to a friend and fellow backyard gardener. Thanks so much for sharing your experiences. Hope you come to Atlanta in the near future.

  10. Please check out and join Garden Girl Farm on Facebook. We are located in Pt. Richmond California. If you are local please come and visit us.Thank you again Novella!

  11. My husband and I just finished your book…we both loved it! Our book group is discussing it next month.

  12. Quite simply, you are a black hole on the legitimacy of the real green movement. What you are doing is self-serving and self-promoting.

    You are creating unnecessary demand for a “product” , which you just happen to sell.
    Clearly, the primary product you are selling is YOU and the so-called farm out of a car at the appropriately named “Ghost Town.” You COULD actually be doing something truly green and helpful for the planet, but you are doing the opposite.

    The violence of killing and eating pets, and then encouraging others to do the same is not green in any form. It’s not a boon to our society, nor does it actually save resources.

    When you claim you are “empowering” someone when you teach them to kill, what you are actually doing is condoning unnecessary violence, just for something interesting to do or pleasurable to eat. That is not sustainable living, it’s simply selfish living.

  13. Would you like to add a June or September Library stop to your tour? Redwood City is doing a Community Building Series and that’s the aspect of your book it would be refreshing to hear about (e.g. sharing food = community building)

    Sincerely,

    Roz Kutler
    Redwood City Public Library

  14. Gail Rossiter, President, Delta Kappa Gamma

    I read your book and was totally inspired. I am wondering if you might consider coming to speak to a group of educators in Alameda who have indicated a huge interest in your book and the subject matter. All of our elementary schools have gardens and teachers are always looking for new inspiration and reasons to get out and get their hands dirty. We all belong to a professional educators group called Delta Kappa Gamma and have monthly meetings.
    Thanks so much.

  15. Gloria Morrison

    Hi Novella,

    I’m having a terrible time printing sections of your blog and I don’t with other web sites. Too bad; after enjoying your book talk at Mrs. Dalloway’s, I would like to share your musings with others.

    Do other admirers have the same problem — printing that is?

    Hope this is temporary.

    Gloria

  16. Gail Rossiter, President, Delta Kappa Gamma

    Is there an email address to discuss your possibly coming to address one of our meetings?
    Thanks,
    Gail

  17. Novella,

    I was at the Albany Library yesterday, and wrote down that the Farmers’ Market is on Wednesday the 28th. Obviously Wednesday is not the 28th.
    Please tell me what day/date is correct.

  18. Roger Ledbetter

    Hi Novella,
    I have never been moved to write an author before, but just finished your book and wanted say how much I enjoyed it. Not sure if ever read a book were I was left with such a warm feeling for the author. But I just feel like I really got to know you, and really liked you. If my path had been slightly different I might very well have been friends with your mother. I actually grew up in Oakland, above 73rd Ave, in an old apple orchard were my mother mass produced apple pies for her church. I have not eaten a good nectorine since I left Oakland in the mid-1960s. Mom also mass produced artichokes, and I’m still struggling with trying to grow them now, and have yet to get any big ones. You didn’t mention artichokes, but they did well for us in Oakland. I probably lost my again this week as it was 11 degrees one morning. In the early 1970s, I moved to a commune in Southern Orgeon started by one of my college professors. So I guess I qualify as a “back to the land old ex-hippie.” Truth of the matter is I was never a very good hippie, and graduated from drugs in the early 1970s. Sort of a Neitzschean-transendentalist-hippie, I guess. I met my wife in San Francisco, and moved to Seattle to live with her. We bought land in Colville, near Kettle Falls Washington, 20 aches to homestead on, but I was working with juvenile delinquents at the time, and really enjoyed my work, and so we never moved to Onion Creek. Instead, we bought a little old mill house outside of Seattle, WA, in Snoqualmie. My wife and I still live and garden here. We have a little greenhouse, vegetable garden, and about 30 fruit trees. We weren’t very good with animals. Seems like the ducks and chickens just kept getting their heads chewed off. Maybe I owe the racoons an apology as I never thought about possums being the perpetrators. I am just finishing up my career in the next few weeks (misdemeanor probation officer for Bellevue. Very uncool, Iguess for a hippie, but feel a lot of statisfaction, looking back over my career, at the people I helped. It was an honor to play a role, no matter how small, in their recoveries from addiction and mental illness.) My wife/partner and I hope to expand the garden for some years before it begins to shrink as our ability to work in it dwindles. I’m currently trying to decide if I am crazy enough for pigs? Maybe just a couple of chickens? I just didn’t like killing the chickens, and the smell of plucking them keep me from wanting to eat them later. Just found out my grandmother who ran a farm, was the same way. Genetics?

    Anywho, today is cidar pressing day, and my son and his girlfriend are finally out of bed. Thanks so much for the good read.

    Roger

  19. I read Farm City and loooved it. Your story is very inspiring (though I draw the line at pigs).

    Any plans to come to Chicago?!

  20. Can’t wait to meet you when you visit SLO!

  21. Novella, I am really looking forward to seeing/meeting you when you visit Appalachian State (App-ah-Latch-un … the correct pronunciation) in early September! I teach Biology here, and I also try to grow as much of my own food as possible, especially in the last 5 years. I’m always inspired by urban farmers, and definitely was re-inspired by your book. So, now I have plans to finish a few raised beds for this fall, put 2 more in next spring, get bees, a few hens for eggs, and I would really love to turn my entire full-sun golf-course lawn into a massive growing area to grow produce for friends, neighbors, and a few non-profit agencies that feed others in my community. Ambitious, yes, I know! But, I’ve been working up to the larger garden and extra mouths, or beaks, to feed :)

    cheers! Tracy Moon

  22. Novella,
    I’m looking for a class where I can learn to process rabbits. There’s a small group of us who are trying to decide if we have the heart/stomach for it before we jump into raising a passel of them. You’re the only resource I’ve found online so far. We’re in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles but Oakland isn’t too far to drive if you’re having a class up there. Thoughts?

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