End of the Season

All is quiet on the farm. I just harvested the last of the tomatoes–man, they were ugly but oh so tasty. I turned them into some yummy ketchup by cooking them with molasses and vinegar and mustard seeds all the rainy day. Tomorrow I’m going to plant the last of the fall starts–broccoli, kale, cauliflower; and some fava bean seeds and call it a day. Bring on the rain! This time of year is a good time to look back and reflect on what worked/what needs further development. Here’s my list…and plans for next year:
Working
Drip irrigation. Finally, finally, I took the plunge and installed a drip irrigation system. Of course after I hooked it up, I wondered why I hadn’t done it before. It actually took a visitor on the farm tour–a young lady who was a school garden teacher–who said, “You know, things would be growing better if you had a drip system.” Girl, you were right. Thanks for the nudge. It cost me about $400 and I installed it myself. So far, especially through the hot streak in October, the drip system has earned its keep. Everything next to an emitter line thrived. The citrus trees each got their own line and even the blueberries, notorious water hogs were happy. I saw the chickens drinking from the emitter line, too, which was an unexpected bonus. I think I always resisted a drip system because of all that plastic. But from what I’ve heard/seen, the lines can last many many years without breaking down.
Chicken Pull-It Shut Door. Lord, I am a lazy urban farmer! Besides my new fangled drip system, I have a chicken door that closes at night and opens in the morning. I love it! The chickens love it.
Chickens. I’ll say it again: chickens are the best weeders! Remember that unsightly patch of bermuda grass that had taken over the garden by the MLK street side fence? I sheet mulched it but it kept coming back. Welp, I moved the chicken coop over yonder and lo and behold: no much bermuda grass. Those girls are ruthless grass eaters.

Not Working
Fig tree. My enormous white fig tree. We got some really uneven ripening and the tree has gotten freaking huge. Gotta hack it back. Chickens do like to sit under it–but what am I, doing everything for the chickens? (As it turns out: yes).
Passion Fruit. So many flowers, so little fruit. There’s this hairy white stuff growing on the vines. Could that be a factor? This was its first year and the few fruits we did get were yummy. Won’t get rid of the vine because it is so cool, spreading really far along the fence and um, the chickens like to eat the leaves…
Minor problems!
OK, now onto the next phase of GT Farm…
Goals 2016 (hoping for 50% of these to actually happen but it’s good to dream)
1. Giant rain catchment tank. Like 5000 gallons. Plumbed from my neighbors roof. Gotta catch all that rain.
2. Break up the rest of the concrete. And install into more organized raised beds. Easy for harvesting.
3. Circular hang space/gazebo. Thinking a circle of fruit trees, seating area, vines growing all over the place. Maybe a guest yurt can go there in the summer months?
4. More flowers. I’m becoming an old lady! I want a cutting garden.
5. Nut trees? I’m taking a class through UC Davis extension all about fruits and nuts so will keep you posted.

Hope you all have a great holiday–see you in January

3 responses to “End of the Season

  1. Love to read your blog. Met you years and years ago at a Randy Oliver beekeeping class. Also saw you speak at the San Leandro Library. You’re funny!

    Just thought I’d share…I just got one of those automatic chicken doors too, with the solar function so we don’t have to use batteries. Yeah we lost many birds over the course of four months to a raccoon as big as a medium dog, no joke. (And the critter will not move on. It’s set up permanent camp somewhere nearby.)

    It took me many years to learn this, but I wouldn’t leave your fruit trees on a daily drip. They will survive it, but develop problems from the stress of too much water, lemons especially. They like to be watered deeply 1-2 weeks depending on the heat, the season. I had mine on a drip for many years and the tree never did well. A friend told me what she does. I took them off at the drip, watered them a lot less and they’re producing more fruit! Well, I add an organic fertilizer more regularly too, at least I did last year.

    Enjoy your winter greens!

    Kristin

  2. Hairy white stuff on the leaves might be mealybugs…they can do some serious damage to a plant…

  3. Let me know when you want some rabbit manure mixed with coffee chaff🙂 christina@therabbihill.com

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